Postgraduate Taught Open Evening

Find out why MSc study might be great for your career and what our programmes in physics or astronomy could offer you.

7th February, 4.30-7.30

Mile End Campus

This event is in two parts, a general open event with information stands, and a physics and astronomy breakout session with talks and Q+A. Please book places on one or both parts depending on your interest.

To attend our general event, chat with staff from the School of Physics and Astronomy and visit information stands related to other aspects of postgraduate study...

book a place at our Postgraduate Taught Open Evening

To attend talks from the directors of our postgraduate programmes and find out why an MSc could be for you...

QMUL astronomer helps to find dormant black hole

Queen Mary astronomer Dr Guillem Anglada Escudé is a member of an international team of astronomers who have used a novel method to find a black hole hiding in a nearby group of stars. Most black holes we know about were identified by the intense radiation emitted from hot gas falling into the black hole; but now the astronomers have been able to detect a “dormant” black hole that is not actively swallowing material. They did this by looking for the gravitational effect it has on a visible star.

PhD Open Afternoon

PhD students at our supercomputer

We’re running an event for anyone considering PhD study. If you’re interested in finding out if a PhD could be the right route, or you are in the process of applying and would like some more detailed information, there’ll be something for you.


12.30 -   Registration opens

12.45 - 1.15  Studying for a PhD, Dr Eram Rizvi - Director of Graduate Studies

1.15 - 1.45  Networking Lunch 

1.45 - 2.55  Talks from our 4 research groups, student research presentations and tours of facilities

3.00 -  Final remarks and close.

If you would like to attend please book a place so we know how many to cater for.

Inaugural lecture by Prof David Berman

On 14 November Prof. David Berman will give his inaugural lecture on “The symmetries of nature and hidden extra dimensions”. He will give an account of how our understanding of nature has progressed through a deeper understanding of its symmetries. By proposing extra, as yet undiscovered, dimensions to space these symmetries become explained by the geometry of the hidden space. Then to capture the different symmetries present in string theory we need to generalise the idea of geometry itself. The lecture and a drinks reception will begin at 18:30 in the Skeel Lecture Theatre in QMUL’s People’s Palace. Please register your attendance here:

Congratulations to 2017 Physics Nobel Prize winners

The School of Physics and Astronomy offers warm congratulations to Rainer Weiss, Kip Thorne and Barry Barish, recipients of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics for their contributions to the detection of gravitational waves by LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory).

Cassini makes its dramatic exit

15 September.  At around 11:30 this morning the Cassini spacecraft sent its final signal to Earth as it plunged into the thick atmosphere of the planet Saturn, bringing to an end its 20-year voyage of discovery, a voyage that has provided scientists with a wealth of data about the ringed planet and its moons, and some of the most thought-provoking images ever captured.

For Queen Mary’s Prof. Carl Murray it was something of a sad moment as it marked the end of a career-long association with the spacecraft. Carl has been a member of the Cassini camera team since 1990 and is one of the scientists who have been privileged to work on the data sent back by the spacecraft since it was launched in 1997. Like many, Carl has come to see Cassini as a constant companion, probing distant worlds where humans cannot (yet) venture.

Queen Mary planet hunters shortlisted for Times Higher Education award

The Pale Red Dot campaign, led by astronomers in QMUL’s School of Physics and Astronomy in partnership with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), has been shortlisted for a Times Higher Education Award in the category “Research Project of the Year: STEM”.

We are first in London for overall student satisfaction

physics graduates

Physics and astronomy ranks first in London for overall student satisfaction according to the results of the 2017 National Student Survey (NSS), based on an overall satisfaction rating of 92%. The School has previously ranked first in London in the NSS in 2016, 2015, and 2014.

The results of the survey, which questions UK undergraduates on various aspects of their student experience, places physics and astronomy 4% higher than the sector average and fourth in the UK for overall satisfaction in Russell Group universities offering the subject..