Inaugural lecture by Prof David Berman

On 14 November Prof. David Berman will give his inaugural lecture on “The symmetries of nature and hidden extra dimensions”. He will give an account of how our understanding of nature has progressed through a deeper understanding of its symmetries. By proposing extra, as yet undiscovered, dimensions to space these symmetries become explained by the geometry of the hidden space. Then to capture the different symmetries present in string theory we need to generalise the idea of geometry itself. The lecture and a drinks reception will begin at 18:30 in the Skeel Lecture Theatre in QMUL’s People’s Palace. Please register your attendance here:  https://davidberman.eventbrite.co.uk

Congratulations to 2017 Physics Nobel Prize winners

The School of Physics and Astronomy offers warm congratulations to Rainer Weiss, Kip Thorne and Barry Barish, recipients of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics for their contributions to the detection of gravitational waves by LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory).

Cassini makes its dramatic exit

15 September.  At around 11:30 this morning the Cassini spacecraft sent its final signal to Earth as it plunged into the thick atmosphere of the planet Saturn, bringing to an end its 20-year voyage of discovery, a voyage that has provided scientists with a wealth of data about the ringed planet and its moons, and some of the most thought-provoking images ever captured.

For Queen Mary’s Prof. Carl Murray it was something of a sad moment as it marked the end of a career-long association with the spacecraft. Carl has been a member of the Cassini camera team since 1990 and is one of the scientists who have been privileged to work on the data sent back by the spacecraft since it was launched in 1997. Like many, Carl has come to see Cassini as a constant companion, probing distant worlds where humans cannot (yet) venture.

Queen Mary planet hunters shortlisted for Times Higher Education award

The Pale Red Dot campaign, led by astronomers in QMUL’s School of Physics and Astronomy in partnership with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), has been shortlisted for a Times Higher Education Award in the category “Research Project of the Year: STEM”.

We are first in London for overall student satisfaction

physics graduates

Physics and astronomy ranks first in London for overall student satisfaction according to the results of the 2017 National Student Survey (NSS), based on an overall satisfaction rating of 92%. The School has previously ranked first in London in the NSS in 2016, 2015, and 2014.

The results of the survey, which questions UK undergraduates on various aspects of their student experience, places physics and astronomy 4% higher than the sector average and fourth in the UK for overall satisfaction in Russell Group universities offering the subject..

 

SKA Cosmology SWG Meeting

We will be hosting a Cosmology SWG meeting at Queen Mary, University of London, in December 2017. The aim of the meeting is to discuss various cosmology-relevant topics (e.g. recent changes to the SKA specifications), and to spend time working on collaborative projects within the focus groups (e.g. developing simulations, updating the Red Book, improving requirements documents).   

Date(s)

Monday 18th December 2017 -  Thursday 21st December 2017

Venue

The meeting will be held in the G. O. Jones building at Queen Mary's Mile End campus in London, UK. We will have several rooms available, including a lecture theatre and a couple of smaller meeting rooms. We also hope to support remote participation through video-conferencing software.   

Programme

Next Undergraduate Open Day - 23rd and 24th June

Want to find out more about studying for a physics degree at QMUL?

Book a place on the University's next open day and come along to the department for taster talks, a session in our teaching laboratory, an observatory demo and more. Talk to staff and current students and get a real feel for what undergraduate life as a physicist is like.

Book online from our Open Day pages

Queen Mary astronomer on Time magazine list of 100 most influential people

Astronomer Guillem Anglada-Escudé of the School of Physics and Astronomy has been named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of 2016. His inclusion on this prestigious list, in the Pioneers category, recognises his discovery of the exoplanet Proxima b, in orbit around the nearest star to Earth (bar the Sun, of course). This was one of the most exciting results ever in the field of exoplanet research and has been widely reported in the scientific and popular media. The planet, which has a mass just a little larger than the Earth’s, lies within the habitable zone around its host star, where liquid water could be present on the planet’s surface — making it a candidate for the existence of some kind of life.

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