Juno Practitioner Status

The School of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to announced that it has been awarded Juno Practitioner status by the Institute of Physics. The aim of Juno is to recognise and reward departments that can demonstrate they have taken action to address the under-representation of women in university physics and to encourage better practice for both women and men.  More information about the Juno programme can be found at http://www.iop.org/policy/diversity/initiatives/juno/index.html. 

The National Student Survey 2013

The National Student Survey 2013

National Student Survey is now open for all 3rd year BSc and 4th year MSci students to complete.  We would like to encourage all of these students to complete the survey as soon as possible.

January sees the launch of the National Student Survey (NSS) 2013 at most Higher Education Institutions and most Further Education Colleges providing Higher Education courses across the UK. The NSS is your opportunity to give your opinions on what you liked about your time at your institution/course as well as things that you felt could have been improved. 

Mini-jets make the Top 10!

An image taken with Cassini's narrow angle camera just after the spacecraft entered orbit around Saturn on 1 July 2004.  The inset shows presence of a "mini-jet" approximately 55km long emanating from the bright core of Saturn's F ring. These features are caused by the gentle (about 2 m/s) impact of icy objects with the core.  QMUL astronomers have shown that there are about 500 examples of such features detectable in the images taken by Cassini's cameras.

Work carried out by planetary scientists in the Astronomy Unit has been chosen as one of the Top 10 Science Highlights of NASA's Cassini mission in 2012.  Nick Attree, Carl Murray, Nick Cooper and Gareth Williams reported their work on trails, or "mini-jets", in Saturn's peculiar F ring in April 2012.  The image was taken with Cassini's narrow angle camera just after the spacecraft entered orbit around Saturn on 1 July 2004.  The inset shows presence of a "mini-jet" approximately 55km long emanating from the bright core of Saturn's F ring.  These features are caused by the gentle (about 2 m/s) impact of icy objects with the core.  The QMUL astronomers have shown that there are about 500 examples of such features detectable in the images taken by Cassini's cameras and provided an explanation for their unusual properties.

2013 Royal Astronomical Society's Group Achievement Award for Geophysics

2013 Royal Astronomical Society's Group Achievement Award for Geophysics

2013 Royal Astronomical Society's Group Achievement Award for Geophysics will be presented to UK MHD Consortium of which QMUL’s Dr David Tsiklauri is a member of.

VISTA creates huge nine-gigapixel zoomable image of 84 million stars

VISTA creates huge nine-gigapixel zoomable image of 84 million stars

A nine-gigapixel zoomable image of 84 million stars has been created by an international team of astronomers using the UK-built VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory. The image is so large that, if printed with the resolution of the average book, it would be nine metres long and seven metres tall. The huge dataset contains ten times more stars than previous studies and is a major step forward for the understanding of our home galaxy, the Milky Way.

Glittering Trails

PASADENA, Calif. - Scientists working with images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft have discovered strange half-mile-sized (kilometer-sized) objects punching through parts of Saturn's F ring, leaving glittering trails behind them.

PASADENA, Calif. - Scientists working with images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft have discovered strange half-mile-sized (kilometer-sized) objects punching through parts of Saturn's F ring, leaving glittering trails behind them.

Astronomy Seminar March 30th

 

14:30 March 30th Maths room 103
Dr. Stefan Renner (University of Lille)
The dynamics of Saturn’s small satellites

Astronomy Seminar March 23

 

14:30 March 23rd Maths room 103
Dr. Timothy Clifton (University of Oxford)
Testing the foundations of the concordance model of cosmology

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