We are first in London for overall student satisfaction

physics graduates

Physics and astronomy ranks first in London for overall student satisfaction according to the results of the 2017 National Student Survey (NSS), based on an overall satisfaction rating of 92%. The School has previously ranked first in London in the NSS in 2016, 2015, and 2014.

The results of the survey, which questions UK undergraduates on various aspects of their student experience, places physics and astronomy 4% higher than the sector average and fourth in the UK for overall satisfaction in Russell Group universities offering the subject..

 

SKA Cosmology SWG Meeting

We will be hosting a Cosmology SWG meeting at Queen Mary, University of London, in December 2017. The aim of the meeting is to discuss various cosmology-relevant topics (e.g. recent changes to the SKA specifications), and to spend time working on collaborative projects within the focus groups (e.g. developing simulations, updating the Red Book, improving requirements documents).   

Date(s)

Monday 18th December 2017 -  Friday 22nd December 2017

Venue

The meeting will be held in the G. O. Jones building at Queen Mary's Mile End campus in London, UK. We will have several rooms available, including a lecture theatre and a couple of smaller meeting rooms. We also hope to support remote participation through video-conferencing software.   

Programme

Next Undergraduate Open Day - 23rd and 24th June

Want to find out more about studying for a physics degree at QMUL?

Book a place on the University's next open day and come along to the department for taster talks, a session in our teaching laboratory, an observatory demo and more. Talk to staff and current students and get a real feel for what undergraduate life as a physicist is like.

Book online from our Open Day pages

Queen Mary astronomer on Time magazine list of 100 most influential people

Astronomer Guillem Anglada-Escudé of the School of Physics and Astronomy has been named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of 2016. His inclusion on this prestigious list, in the Pioneers category, recognises his discovery of the exoplanet Proxima b, in orbit around the nearest star to Earth (bar the Sun, of course). This was one of the most exciting results ever in the field of exoplanet research and has been widely reported in the scientific and popular media. The planet, which has a mass just a little larger than the Earth’s, lies within the habitable zone around its host star, where liquid water could be present on the planet’s surface — making it a candidate for the existence of some kind of life.

Queen Mary astronomer nominated for WIRED Audi Innovation award

Guillem Anglada Escudé of the School of Physics and Astronomy was one of the nominees for the prestigious WIRED Scientific Breakthrough award, one of the WIRED Audi Innovation Awards for 2016, for his discovery of a planet in orbit around the nearest star to Earth, Proxima Centauri.

Experimental Black Hole evaporation

Over the past decade it has become clear that one can, in analog systems, test Hawking's predition from 1974 that black holes have a temperature created by the properties of the metric near the horizon. These analogs (dumb holes) can be based on a variety of waves in matter-- sound waves in a fluid, surface gravity waves in a fluid, light in medium are just some examples-- and experiments are being carried out which give strong evidence that Hawking's arguments, despite their physical problems, are correct in the real world, and thus are also correct for true black holes. This is the subject of this talk

Speaker: Professor William G. Unruh, The University of British Columbia, Canada.

Date: 28 October 2016

Venue: GO Jones LT

Time: 16:00-18:00

Refreshments will be served after the event at the GO Jones building's foyer

Stars get their discs in a twist

An international team of astronomers that includes Richard Nelson of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered a truly unusual example of planet formation around a star.

The familiar picture is that planets form from a disc of gas and dust that circles around a star. When two stars are in orbit around each other — a system known as a binary star — we would not be surprised to see a disc around each star. But now the astronomers, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope in Chile, have discovered a binary system in which each star does indeed have a disc around it, but there is also a third, shared disc surrounding the pair of stars.

New Earth-like planet found around nearest star

Clear evidence of a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System, has been found by an international team of scientists led by astronomers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Using facilities operated by ESO (the European Southern Observatory) and other telescopes, the research, which is published in the journal Nature, reveals a world with a similar mass to Earth orbiting around Proxima Centauri.

The planet, called Proxima b, orbits its parent star every 11 days and has a temperature suitable for liquid water to exist on its surface. This rocky world is a little more massive than the Earth, and is the closest planet outside our Solar System. Planets around other stars are commonly referred to as exoplanets.

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