SIGNALLING INSIDE WIRED NEURAL NETWORKS: A QUEST FOR PRINCIPLES

Memory formation in the brain is thought to rely on the remodeling of synaptic connections which eventually results in neural network rewiring. This remodeling is likely to involve ultrathin astroglial protrusions which often occur in the immediate vicinity of excitatory synapses. The phenomenology, cellular mechanisms, and causal relationships of such astroglial restructuring remain, however, poorly understood. This is in large part because monitoring and probing of the underpinning molecular machinery on the scale of nanoscopic astroglial compartments remains a challenge. We will discuss recent observations concerning morphological astroglial plasticity, the respective monitoring methods, and some of the newly emerging techniques that might help with conceptual advances in the area. 

Speaker: Professor Dmitri Rusakov, Institute of Neurology, UCL

Queen Mary astronomer nominated for WIRED Audi Innovation award

Guillem Anglada Escudé of the School of Physics and Astronomy was one of the nominees for the prestigious WIRED Scientific Breakthrough award, one of the WIRED Audi Innovation Awards for 2016, for his discovery of a planet in orbit around the nearest star to Earth, Proxima Centauri.

Experimental Black Hole evaporation

Over the past decade it has become clear that one can, in analog systems, test Hawking's predition from 1974 that black holes have a temperature created by the properties of the metric near the horizon. These analogs (dumb holes) can be based on a variety of waves in matter-- sound waves in a fluid, surface gravity waves in a fluid, light in medium are just some examples-- and experiments are being carried out which give strong evidence that Hawking's arguments, despite their physical problems, are correct in the real world, and thus are also correct for true black holes. This is the subject of this talk

Speaker: Professor William G. Unruh, The University of British Columbia, Canada.

Date: 28 October 2016

Venue: GO Jones LT

Time: 16:00-18:00

Refreshments will be served after the event at the GO Jones building's foyer

Stars get their discs in a twist

An international team of astronomers that includes Richard Nelson of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered a truly unusual example of planet formation around a star.

The familiar picture is that planets form from a disc of gas and dust that circles around a star. When two stars are in orbit around each other — a system known as a binary star — we would not be surprised to see a disc around each star. But now the astronomers, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope in Chile, have discovered a binary system in which each star does indeed have a disc around it, but there is also a third, shared disc surrounding the pair of stars.

New Earth-like planet found around nearest star

Clear evidence of a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System, has been found by an international team of scientists led by astronomers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Using facilities operated by ESO (the European Southern Observatory) and other telescopes, the research, which is published in the journal Nature, reveals a world with a similar mass to Earth orbiting around Proxima Centauri.

The planet, called Proxima b, orbits its parent star every 11 days and has a temperature suitable for liquid water to exist on its surface. This rocky world is a little more massive than the Earth, and is the closest planet outside our Solar System. Planets around other stars are commonly referred to as exoplanets.

Top for Student Satisfaction in London

The School of Physics and Astronomy has been ranked first in London for overall satisfaction for the third year running in the 2016 National Student Survey (NSS 2016). 

The results of the nationwide poll of final year undergraduates are a reflection of the School’s commitment to provide a friendly and supportive learning environment with the highest quality of teaching.

QMUL as a whole was ranked first in London for overall satisfaction out of institutions in the Russell Group (a group of leading universities for teaching and research). 

For the more on our NSS 2016 results see the QMUL News page.

Post exam open day - Undergraduate

QMUL open day helper

Thinking again about where you'd like to study next year?

Join admissions staff and current students for a laid-back event designed to give you a second chance to find out about life as a student at the School of Physics and Astronomy at QMUL.

1.00pm - 3.00pm Thursday 14th July

For event location, map and booking details visit the event page.

Session content

  • Top tips for preparing for life as a physics student

  • Information and advice from our Director of Admissions, including tips for clearing and adjustment

  • Chat to current students about study and social life

  • Take a tour of our campus and facilities

Register for our Undergraduate Open Day

As part of a university-wide event, we're running demonstrations, talks, tours, activities and taster lectures over two days designed to give you an insight into life as a physics student. We'll also be on hand to answer questions about applications, study options and talk about what a physics degree from QMUL can do for your future!

Undergraduate Open day: 8th October

The open day really is the best way to find out more about the study at the School of Physics and Astronomy at QMUL. Don't forget to register online for updates on the schedule as it develops!

Find out more and register online

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