Register for our Undergraduate Open Day

As part of a university-wide event, we're running demonstrations, talks, tours, activities and taster lectures over two days designed to give you an insight into life as a physics student. We'll also be on hand to answer questions about applications, study options and talk about what a physics degree from QMUL can do for your future!

Undergraduate Open day: 24th and 25th June 2016

The open day really is the best way to find out more about the study at the School of Physics and Astronomy at QMUL. Don't forget to register online for updates on the schedule as it develops!

Find out more and register online

Summer Internship Opportunity for our undergraduate students **Internal Only**

The School of Physics and Astronomy is seeking to award a summer internship offering experience in web programming and particle physics. The Intern will contribute to the development of a prototype web app for enhancing science teaching delivery in secondary schools.

The School of Physics and Astronomy has a highly active outreach and recruitment team, delivering a wide range of activities to widen participation in higher education, enhance science education and strengthen the relationship between Queen Mary and the wider community.

For more information, please visit our HR website.

Student blog gets underway Articlephysics.org

The School of Physics and Astronomy student blog articlephysics.org has picked up momentum since its launch in February. The blog now features several stories by different student bloggers covering everything from MSc project choice and revision strategies to gender equality in physics and life as a student in London.

The purpose of the blog is to give prospective students an insight into life in the School of Physics and Astronomy as well as giving current students the chance to create original content on subjects that interest them.

Gabriele Travaglini receives Bessel Award

Professor Gabriele Travaglini at a whiteboard

Professor Gabriele Travaglini has been awarded one of the 2016 Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Awards of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. The Bessel Award is given each year to researchers from all disciplines in recognition of their outstanding research record and exceptional future promise. The prize will also allow him to spend a period of one year at Humboldt University Berlin, where he will work in the group of Professor Jan Plefka on Scattering Amplitudes - the fundamental quantities at the heart of quantum theory, which are central to our understanding of the fundamental interactions of Nature.

New video: MSc programmes in Astrophysics and Physics

Opening frame from MSc video

Hear Simon and Alex, two of our current master's level students, talk about their work at the School of Physics and Astronomy. Find out about facilities, projects, academic supervision and taught modules as well as the inspiring nature of higher level physics and astronomy. 

Click here to watch the videos on our youtube channel.

New MSc Astrophysics scholarships

VISTA telescope image

Students enrolling on an MSc in Astrophysics in 2016 are eligible to apply for a new scholarship scheme for both home/EU students and overseas students.

The 2 amounts of £2,250 (home/EU students) and one amount of £4,500 (overseas students) and are open to students with a first class bachelor's degree (or international equivalent) in related field.

For further details and information on how to apply visit the scholarship webpage

LIGO’s cosmological revolution heralds new age for Queen Mary Physicists

Today’s announcement from LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) concerning gravitational waves has rekindled excitement in the amazing predictions of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. The detection of these waves provides experimental verification of Einstein’s relativity in even the most extreme circumstances, the collision of two black holes.

A gravitational wave is like a ripple that stretches space and time, moving at the speed of light. Their existence has been postulated for a hundred years, but finding them required the highest precision in experimental physics and some luck.

To stand a chance of finding these moving ripples in spacetime we need a large source of accelerating matter. The collision and merger of blackholes is one such source though there could certainly be others.

Postgraduate Open Evening - 10th Feb

We're running a postgraduate open evening on Wednesday the 10th Feb from 4.30 - 7.30.

If you're considering an MSc in Physics or Astrophysics, this is a great opportuntity to find out more. Join us for an evening of talks and a chance to chat to academic programme directors and admissions staff. 

Book a place

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