Thomas Young Center (TYC Soiree): New understanding of liquids and supercritical fluids

The moving contact line problem occurs when modelling one fluid replacing another as it moves along a solid surface, a situation widespread throughout industry and nature. Classically, the no-slip boundary condition at the solid substrate, a zero-thickness interface between the fluids, and motion at the three-phase contact line are incompatible - leading to the well-known shear-stress singularity. In this talk we will review recent progress made by our group, considering the problem and related physics from the micro to macroscopic length scales.

Network Geometry

Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the  Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks  has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and  data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and  geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Here we show that a single two parameter  model of emergent network geometry, constructed by gluing triangles, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of  curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties  with finite spectral dimensionality.

National Student Survey Results 2015

Physics and Astronomy at Queen Mary University of London is ranked first in London for student satisfaction for the second year in a row, according to the results of a nationwide poll of final-year undergraduates.

The 2015 National Student Survey (NSS) questioned UK undergraduates on various aspects of their student experience, including their overall satisfaction.  Physics and Astronomy students at Queen Mary had a 95% satisfaction rate, amongst some of the highest in the country.   Our students are also amongst the most satisfied in the Russell Group with satisfaction rates in the top quartile for all physics programmes. 

The School of Physics and Astronomy strives to provide a friendly supportive environment and is committed to the highest levels of teaching and student support.  

STFC's Ernest Rutherford Fellowships

Lord Rutherford of Nelson

STFC's prestigious five-year fellowships are open to early career researchers of any nationality in the areas of Astronomy, Solar and Planetary Science, Cosmology, Particle Astrophysics and Particle Physics (including String Theory). As the number of applications from each institution is limited by STFC, the School of Physics and Astronomy will be supporting four applicants across the Astronomy, Particle Physics and String Theory research groups. Researchers in the areas of astronomy or string theory who wish to be supported in their applications by the School should submit a draft case for support, CV and publication list by Friday 28th August 2015. Decisions about which candidates will be supported will be made by Friday 4th September 2015.

Juno Champion

Institute of Physics Juno Champion

QMUL’s School of Physics and Astronomy has been awarded Juno Champion Status by the Institute of Physics (IOP) in recognition of action they have taken to address the under-representation of women in university physics.

Quantum photonics with spins in semiconductor nanostructures

Electron and hole spins can be confined in a variety of semiconductor nanostructures, including quantum dots, nanowires or monolayers. These spins can have long coherence times and can be addressed using ultra-fast optical techniques. This makes them very suitable for quantum photonics, which promises advances in fields such as quantum communication, sensing and computation. We focus on electron spins confined in self-assembled InAs quantum dots, which are initialized, manipulated and read out using optical techniques. In recent years it has been established that the electron spin’s coherence time is limited by fluctuations in the nuclear spin bath, which couple to the electron spin via the hyperfine interaction. Hole spins are less affected, but they suffer from electric fluctuations due to the hole’s larger spin-orbit interaction.

Sino-British workshop on molecular magnetism

As part of the Queen Mary University of London and Peking University joint research project on Molecular Magnetism, we will be holding a 1-day workshop to disseminate key results of the project, and open up a wider debate in the UK and Chinese scientific communities on open problems in molecular magnetism. Presentations will be given by academics and researchers involved in the project, as well as those from external institutions. Presentations will be on a variety of topics, such as single molecular magnets, metal-organic framework materials and novel high frequency methods used to measure them. Key speakers include Profs Song Gao, Bingwu Wang and Zheming Wang from Peking University, Drs Alan Drew and Anthony Phillips from QMUL, Prof Rob Hicken from Exeter University, Dr Jorge Quintanilla from Kent University and Dr Francis Pratt from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

UK Cosmology Meeting

On the 27th February, the cosmology group in the Astronomy Unit hosted the UK Cosmology Meeting. This is a triannual informal meeting of the UK theoretical cosmology community and features short talks from young and experienced researchers alike. The meeting was a huge success with roughly 60 cosmologists attending from as far away as Edinburgh. More information about the UK Cosmology initiative and future meetings can be found at their website